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7 Best Composting Toilets of 2024

Updated
Composting toilets are eco-friendly and odorless.

A composting toilet is an eco-friendly way to reduce your water use while turning waste into natural fertilizer. As they don’t need to be plumbed in, they are also ideal for adding a toilet to your garden, an outbuilding, an RV, or a boat.

Composting toilets are very easy to install, so they are a great option for adding to your home or wherever else you need one. However, it is important to choose a toilet that will work effectively and is easy to maintain.

To help you find the right unit, we have reviewed seven of the best composting toilets that are currently available. We chose these toilets for their eco-friendliness, size, tank capacity, and whether or not they require any water to use.

Our Top Picks

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Image
Model
Product Comparison Table
Features

Product Image of the Ogo Compost Toilet
Best for Odor
Ogo Compost Toilet
  • Odor-free
  • Made in the USA
  • Features an electronic agitator
Product Image of the Camco 41541 Portable Travel Toilet
Best for RVs
Camco 41541 Portable Travel Toilet
  • Compact footprint
  • Bellows-type flush pump
  • Ideal for RVs
Product Image of the Reliance Products Luggable Loo
Best for Camping
Reliance Products Luggable Loo
  • Snap-on seat and lid
  • Doesn't require any connections
  • 20-liter capacity
Product Image of the Porta Potti White by Thetford
Best Portable Composting Toilet
Porta Potti White by Thetford
  • Battery-operated flush
  • 21-liter capacity
  • Tank level indicator
Product Image of the Nature’s Head Composting Toilet
Best Self Contained Composting Toilet
Nature’s Head Composting Toilet
  • Spider handle agitator
  • 22-liter liquids bin
  • Includes a 12-volt fan
Product Image of the Separett Villa 9215 AC/DC
Best High Capacity Composting Toilet
Separett Villa 9215 AC/DC
  • 5-year warranty
  • Swedish design
  • AC and DC compatible
Product Image of the Sun-Mar GTG Composting Toilet
Best Non-Electric Composting Toilet
Sun-Mar GTG Composting Toilet
  • Low maintenance
  • No electricity required
  • Compact design


The Best Composting Toilets of 2024

With an increasing number of people looking to become more eco-friendly and even going off-grid, composting toilets are more popular than ever before. To help you choose from the many products that are available, we have reviewed seven of the best composting toilets you can buy today. We chose these toilets for their eco-friendliness, size, whether or not they separate waste, and any external connections they might require.

Ogo Composting Toilet

Best Composting Toilet for Odor

Ogo’s composting toilet is a very popular choice that works far more quickly than most units. When you press the button for the powered agitator, it will mix any solid waste with your chosen compost medium. This makes it much faster than natural composting. The toilet’s sleek, compact design means it occupies very little space.

A fan and a ventilator hose quickly deal with odors. The fan draws out any air inside the solid waste chamber to remove smells and quickly dry it out as the composting process occurs.

This Ogo toilet is robust and suitable for almost any location. If you want a full-size toilet for your log cabin or RV, this is an excellent option.

Pros

  • Odor-free
  • Made in the USA
  • Features an agitator
  • Large urine bottle and solid waste bin
  • Robust materials

Cons

  • Very expensive
  • Requires electricity

Product Specs

Weight (pounds) 28
Dimensions (inches) 15 x 16 x 18.38
Agitator Yes
Bin capacity 2.4-gallon
Price $$$$
Warranty 5-year plastic components; 1 year electrical components

Our Ratings

Efficiency
4.5 / 5
Design
4.5 / 5
Odor Control
4.5 / 5
Ease of Use
4 / 5
Total Rating
4.25 / 5

User Experience

I've had mixed experiences with this OGO compost toilet. Comparing it to my old Natures Head, it's less sturdy and lacks comfort. The mechanism to open the solid section tends to stick, making it tough to operate, and the grey urine jug prevents me from seeing when it's getting full. On the positive side, the auger that mixes the poop bucket is a nice touch, but it falls short after 15 uses before needing to empty and refill with coco coir. While it's relatively easy to empty, the overall experience could be improved with more comfort and better design features.

Camco 41541 Portable Travel Toilet

Best Composting Toilet for RVs

This Camco travel model is a very compact toilet, so it is ideal for the limited space onboard an RV. Even so, its efficient design means it is still comfortable to sit on and has all the necessary features for efficient use.

Its bin can hold 5.3 gallons of waste and it is detachable to allow for easy disposal of its contents. The flush tank is 2.5 liters and has a sliding lid to seal the toilet.

As this is a travel toilet, it doesn’t separate the solids from the liquids, but it is an ideal choice for use in an RV. This toilet delivers all the essentials in one compact package. It even has a bellows-type flush pump.

Pros

  • User-friendly
  • Easy to empty
  • Ideal for RVs
  • Compact
  • Affordable

Cons

  • Doesn’t separate waste
  • Won’t produce usable compost
  • Odors can build up over time

Product Specs

Weight (pounds) 10.8
Dimensions (inches) 14 x 16 x 15.5
Agitator No
Bin capacity 20 liters
Price $$
Warranty 1-year

Our Ratings

Efficiency
4 / 5
Design
4.5 / 5
Odor Control
3.5 / 5
Ease of Use
4.5 / 5
Total Rating
4 / 5

Personal Perspective

If you're like me, dealing with mobility issues, this commode has been a real asset. It's sturdy and well-built, but don't expect a comfy seat - it's pretty hard and sits lower than I'd prefer. I've had a couple of mishaps due to the seat opening being surprisingly small, and the flush pump is a bit of a challenge to push down. That said, it's been a reliable solution to my needs, and a few tablespoons of bleach in the tank after each use keeps it fresh and helps with cleaning.

Reliance Products Luggable Loo

Best Composting Toilet for Camping

At a glance, this Reliance Products toilet might look like a bucket with a lid, and that is essentially the case. However, its compact size, light weight, and ease of use mean the Luggable Loo will probably seem like a luxury on a camping trip.

It has a snap-on seat and lid and a metal handle. It can be used with biodegradable portable toilet bags for easy waste disposal. This is a very simple solution to your toilet needs and is much cheaper than some of the high-end models we have looked at.

The chamber has a 20-liter capacity, which should be enough for multiple days. However, if you want to prevent unpleasant odors, you should consider emptying the bucket daily.

Pros

  • Extremely simple
  • Snap-on seat and lid
  • Lightweight
  • 20-liter capacity
  • Very affordable

Cons

  • One step up from a bucket
  • Creates odors

Product Specs

Weight (pounds) 3.2
Dimensions (inches) 34 x 37 x 32.5
Agitator No
Bin capacity 20 liters
Price $
Warranty 5-year

Our Ratings

Efficiency
3.5 / 5
Design
3 / 5
Odor Control
2.5 / 5
Ease of Use
5 / 5
Total Rating
3.5 / 5

Community Feedback

Got my Luggable Loo for my first boating season and it's been a game changer. Paired with a large poncho, it's a discreet and comfortable solution for when nature calls, even amidst other boaters. Use some clumping kitty litter in the bucket to absorb the smell, and remember to cover it with plastic to avoid moisture issues. Whether you're a trucker, fisher, camper, or just teaching a long online class from your basement, this Loo is reliable, durable, and solves a very basic problem in a variety of situations.

Porta Potti White by Thetford

Best Portable Composting Toilet

Compared to some of the more basic portable toilet solutions, this Thetford Porta Potti is at the other end of the spectrum. It has a more refined design, intended to be as similar to a conventional toilet as possible. It has a tank level indicator, a water tank that should provide about 50 flushes, and a container that holds 21 liters.

It has a battery-powered flush and a rotating mess-free spout for minimal splashback when removing the contents. An airtight valve prevents leaks. This Porta Potti is designed with comfort in mind, with a seat height that will be similar to a home toilet. It even has a built-in toilet roll holder for added convenience.

The toilet’s sliding lid snaps shut to seal in any unpleasant smells and the waste compartment is easily detached when the time comes to empty the contents.

Pros

  • Battery-operated flush
  • 21-liter capacity
  • Tank level indicator
  • Rotating spout
  • Sealed lid

Cons

  • Doesn’t separate solid and liquid waste
  • The holding tank is heavy when full
  • Prone to odors

Product Specs

Weight (pounds) 13.45
Dimensions (inches) 18.39 x 15.75 x 17.83
Agitator No
Bin capacity 21 liters
Price $$
Warranty 3-year

Our Ratings

Efficiency
4 / 5
Design
4.5 / 5
Odor Control
3.5 / 5
Ease of Use
4.5 / 5
Total Rating
4 / 5

First-Hand Impression

My experience with this portable toilet has been largely positive, especially due to its higher than average height and the comfort it provides to a person of my bulky build. The sleek design and automatic flush feature make it feel closer to a real home toilet, which is a significant improvement over my previous Fiamma model. However, the process of emptying it is somewhat cumbersome, and initially put a strain on my back, but I've grown used to it over time. Despite this, the waste disposal of the Thetford Curve is far superior to the Fiamma, making an otherwise unpleasant task more bearable.

Nature’s Head Composting Toilet

Best Self Contained Composting Toilet

This Nature’s Head composting toilet features a spider handle that controls its agitator. This allows the overall width to be narrower, which makes this toilet better suited to confined spaces.

Nature’s Head doesn’t share the specific capacity of this toilet’s solids bin, but they claim that two people will get four to six weeks of use from it before it needs to be emptied. The liquids container holds 2.2 gallons.

There is a built-in 12-volt fan located in the head to help aerate any solid waste. It circulates the air, aiding the composting process and reducing odors, so this is a great option if you want to avoid bad smells.

The only downside to this model is its price. It costs the same amount as some of the best high-end home toilets that are currently available and twice as much as many of its competitors.

Pros

  • No odors
  • 4 to 6-week capacity
  • Spider handle agitator
  • 2.2-liter liquids bin
  • 12-volt fan

Cons

  • Very expensive

Product Specs

Weight (pounds) 28
Dimensions (inches) 22 x 20.5 x 21.7
Agitator Yes (spider handle)
Bin capacity 2.2-gallon
Price $$$$
Warranty 5-year

Our Ratings

Efficiency
4.5 / 5
Design
4.5 / 5
Odor Control
4.5 / 5
Ease of Use
4 / 5
Total Rating
4.25 / 5

User Experience

I'm using this composting toilet for about three months now in my off-grid living situation. It's a simple, yet effective system, but it has its quirks. While it's compact and fits well in small spaces, it required some minor fixes such as re-soldering a faulty wire and adjusting the fan. The system requires regular maintenance like emptying the urine container weekly, and solid waste around every five weeks, while ensuring nothing but toilet paper goes into the solid bin. Despite some minor inconveniences, it's been a functional addition to my lifestyle.

Separett Villa 9215 AC/DC

Best High Capacity Composting Toilet

The Separett Villa toilet operates on both AC and DC currents, so it is suitable for mains or solar/battery use. It is a one-piece toilet, so it doesn’t require assembly. As the company is based in the United States, you will enjoy excellent customer service.

Its Swedish design is functional and minimalist, supported by robust construction. What sets this model apart from its competitors is that it doesn’t have a tank for liquids. Instead, a 6-foot-long pipe connects the toilet to a drainage hole to allow liquid waste to run away.

The solids tank holds almost 27.5 liters of waste, so you should be able to use this toilet for several weeks without needing to use it.

The toilet’s liquid draining system makes it ideal for use at home or in a cabin but means it won’t be suitable for use on a boat or in an RV.

Pros

  • Sturdy construction
  • One-piece design
  • AC or DC compatible
  • High capacity
  • Swedish design

Cons

  • Very expensive
  • Liquid drainage requires plumbing

Product Specs

Weight (pounds) 30
Dimensions (inches) 26.5 x 18 x 21.3
Agitator No
Bin capacity 27.3 liters
Price $$$$
Warranty 5-year

Our Ratings

Efficiency
4.5 / 5
Design
4.5 / 5
Odor Control
4 / 5
Ease of Use
4 / 5
Total Rating
4.25 / 5

Personal Perspective

I'm currently using this compost toilet daily, and it's been a year and a half of learning. Installation proved simple enough with the right tools, and the fan's efficiency was proven when I accidentally unplugged it for a day. Cleaning the main bucket is straightforward, just remember to breathe through your mouth, and odd spots like behind the bucket and under it can be tricky to clean. Despite minor issues like urine stains on the output and a seat that needs occasional tightening, this toilet has been a reliable addition to my daily routine.

Sun-Mar GTG Composting Toilet

Best Non-Electric Composting Toilet

This Sun-Mar GTG composting toilet doesn’t require any external connections to function and can be installed very quickly. It has separate solids and liquids containers to produce usable compost and it is NSF certified. This means it has been tested at capacity for six months to check the quality of its compost without any unpleasant odors.

Installation is very simple. You simply need to connect the ventilation tube and fix the toilet to the floor. Make sure there are no bends in the ventilation to ensure the odors can escape freely.

Before using the toilet for the first time, a peat and microbe mix will need to be added to the compost bin to kickstart the decomposition process. Thankfully, Sun-Mar provides a free sachet to get you started.

Pros

  • No electricity is required
  • Ideal for RVs and boats
  • Low maintenance
  • Easy to use and install
  • Detachable footrest
  • Agitator handle

Cons

  • Expensive
  • No fan

Product Specs

Weight (pounds) 25
Dimensions (inches) 24 x 15.75 x 19.8
Agitator Yes
Bin capacity 6 gallons for solids
Price $$$$
Warranty Not stated

Our Ratings

Efficiency
4 / 5
Design
4 / 5
Odor Control
3.5 / 5
Ease of Use
4.5 / 5
Total Rating
4 / 5

Community Feedback

When I first got this toilet, I was excited by its sturdy build, though I was initially put off by the high price tag. It's bigger than you'd expect, so if you're planning to use it in an RV, make sure to measure your space first. Don't expect to return or exchange this toilet if it doesn't fit. A few issues did crop up: I had to replace the fan and the urine catch bowl is too shallow, which led me to a DIY solution involving a dowel and some waterproof sealant. Despite the challenges and its porous material that's tough to keep clean, I've found it to be a useful and easy-to-clean alternative to traditional toilets.

Product Comparison Chart

Product Best Weight Dimensions Agitator Bin capacity Warranty
Ogo Compost Toilet Odor 28 lbs 15 x 16 x 18.38″ Yes 2.4-gal 5-year
Camco 41541 Portable Travel Toilet RVs 10.8 lbs 14 x 16 x 15.5″ No 20 L 1-year
Reliance Products Luggable Loo Camping 3 lbs 34 x 37 x 32.5″ No 20 L 5-year
Porta Potti White by Thetford Portable 13 lbs 18.39 x 15.75 x 17.83″ No 21 L 3-year
Nature’s Head Composting Toilet Self-Contained 28 lbs 22 x 20.5 x 21.7″ Yes 2.2-gal 5-year
Separett Villa 9215 AC/DC High-Capacity 30 lbs 26.5 x 18 x 21.3″ No 27.3 L 5-year
Sun-Mar Non-Electric Composting Toilet Non-Electric 25 lbs 24 x 15.75 x 19.8″ Yes 6 gal N/A

What Is a Composting Toilet?

A composting toilet is designed to collect human waste and encourage it to decompose using natural bacteria instead of chemicals. This process breaks down the organic matter and turns the waste into a natural fertilizer that can be disposed of or sprinkled onto plants to help them grow.

Unlike conventional flushing toilets, composting toilets use aerobic bacteria, so they are very eco-friendly. To make this process as efficient as possible, they often contain carbon-rich materials such as wood chips, sawdust, and coffee grinds.

Benefits of a Composting Toilet

There is a popular misconception that composting toilets are dirty and smelly, but modern toilets are clean and relatively odorless. Composting toilets have multiple benefits:

Eco-Friendly

If you have a garden, a composting toilet is a great source of natural fertilizer. Any waste that goes into the toilet can be recycled and spread onto plants to help them grow.

Reduced Water Consumption

Unlike a conventional toilet, which uses several liters of water with every flush, a composting toilet is either completely dry or uses very little water. It uses aerobic bacteria to decompose the waste naturally.

Great for Off-Grid Use

If you have a cabin or want to live off-grid, a composting toilet is an excellent solution to your bathroom needs. They can be installed anywhere.

Ideal for Boats and RVs

Rather than filling a traditional waste tank on your boat or RV, you might be better served by a composting toilet. This could save you a lot of money in the long run as you will no longer need to pump out the waste tank to empty it.

Disadvantages of a Composting Toilet

Although a composting toilet has several benefits, there are also some drawbacks to using one:

Less Convenient

Modern plumbing has made using standard toilets very convenient. All you need to do is flush it and your waste will be washed away. In contrast, a composting toilet will need to be prepared and emptied manually.

Extra Costs

Composting toilets cost more to buy and you will need to spend money to maintain them. They require carbon matter such as sawdust and wood chips to break down waste more efficiently.

More Maintenance

Unlike a flushing toilet, you will need to monitor your composting toilet to ensure that the composting process is working effectively and there is no cross-contamination.

Potential Hazards

In general, composting toilets are very safe but improper installation or maintenance can lead to unpleasant smells or insect infestation. If this happens, the issue can be difficult to get rid of.

How to Choose a Composting Toilet

Like any toilet, there is a surprising amount of variety and decisions you will need to make when choosing a composting toilet. If you take the time to consider some key points, it will help you find the right model for your needs.

Available Space

If you are putting your toilet in an RV or on a boat, you will have a limited amount of space to work with, which will limit the size of your composting toilet. Some are designed to be placed in tight spaces and corners, while freestanding models can be placed anywhere.

You should also consider whether you have access to an electrical supply, as some toilets have special features that require power to function. However, the majority of models won’t require any kind of external connection.

Portable Vs. Composting

Any toilet that doesn’t use chemicals is essentially a composting toilet. While some toilets keep the two types of human waste separate, others allow them to mix in the same container. If you want to use your waste as a fertilizer, you will need to keep solid waste away from the liquid.

On the other hand, if you just want an off-grid alternative to a conventional flush toilet but don’t plan to reuse your waste, a portable version will suffice. Portable toilets are often found in RVs and boats, due to their compact size.

Tank Capacity

The size of the tank you need will depend on how many people use the toilet and how often. If you own a cabin that will accommodate four or more people on vacation, a composting toilet with a small capacity is unlikely to be able to keep up with your needs.

On the other hand, there is no point in spending extra money on a toilet with a large capacity if you don’t need it. A toilet for your RV or boat can usually have a smaller capacity than one in a cabin or an off-grid home.

Required Connections

Some composting toilets use a small amount of water to flush, but a much smaller volume than a conventional toilet. Others might have small fans that require electricity to function. These fans help to dry out the solid matter and disperse any odors that might be present.

Many composting toilets use a trap system to separate the waste and contain any smells. This means everyone will need to sit down to pee, so check that this won’t be a problem.

Check with the Government

Some regions have local laws that require a permit if you want to install a composting toilet. You should check this before buying a toilet to ensure you aren’t wasting your money. Seek advice from your nearest government office if you want a definitive answer as to which toilet types you are allowed.


Installation and Maintenance

In the United States, composting toilets are subject to National Sanitation Foundation Standard 41, which states that the toilet must be fit for purpose and have the same capacity as advertised (1). It must also meet the specified bacterial levels.

To receive this certification, every composting toilet is rigorously tested over 6 months to ensure that it meets the requirements.

Installation

For this example, we are using a Nature’s Head toilet. Everything you need to install the toilet is included in the pack:

  • 5 feet of hose with ends inside vent fans
  • 4 mounting bolts
  • 2 mounting brackets and knobs
  • 18-inch single-pin cable for the 12-volt fan
  • Allen wrench to install the handle
  • Fuse holder and fuse
  • Spray bottle

Composting toilets are usually fairly basic in design, which means they are straightforward to install. Make sure there is enough space to accommodate the unit, for the agitator handle to turn, and to remove the bin or bins.

Attach the toilet to the floor using the included brackets and ensure the ventilator hose is able to reach outside. If it can’t, you will need to install the 12-volt fan to enhance the ventilation process.

Maintenance

Every time you use the toilet, you will need to turn the agitator handle to kickstart the composting process. You also need to add a carbon-rich source such as wood chips, sawdust, or even coffee grinds and peat moss.

You should check the liquids and solids containers regularly. The liquid bin will require emptying more frequently. The solids container will take longer to fill up but you will need to remember to add the dry additive each time you empty it.

These processes are largely the same with every composting toilet, with the main difference being how the containers are removed and emptied.

Preparing and Dumping the Bins

1. Prepping the Bins

How best to dispose of waste from a compost toilet bin is a subject of frequent debate. With flush toilets, you won’t even need to think about this, but a dry toilet requires extra planning.

Before using the toilet, you will need to prepare it. Add a layer of a dry mixture such as coconut coir, sawdust, or wood shavings. You can also add coffee grinds or peat moss. Make sure the mixture level stays below the agitator and that it is hydrated and damp.

2. Dumping the Bins

When the bins are full, you will need to dump the contents. True compost bins will have two separate containers.

Solids – If you notice the agitator handle becoming difficult to turn, the bin is full and needs to be emptied. You should wait 6 to 12 hours to allow the waste to start breaking down before you remove it.

Top Tip

You can buy a second solids bin to allow waste to break down for longer after the bin has been filled. This will improve the quality of your compost when you remove it from the bin.

How to empty the solids bin varies from model to model. For a Nature’s Head toilet, tip the contents into a 13-gallon trash bag. You can buy biodegradable trash bags if you want to be more eco-friendly. At this stage, the contents won’t be ready to sprinkle over your garden. Instead, pour it into a compost bin where it can continue to decompose.

Liquids – Nature’s Head models hold around two gallons of liquid that need to be emptied every three to four days. You will be able to see when the tank is full as it is translucent. Always make sure the lid is secure, for obvious reasons.

This liquid can be used in a plant feed solution, so it has some use in your garden. Don’t dump or apply too much in one spot or it could start to smell. Always check local regulations to make sure you aren’t breaking any rules.

Composting Toilet FAQs

Can You Pee in a Composting Toilet?

You can urinate in a composting toilet but it needs to be kept separate from solid waste. If cross-contamination occurs, it will interfere with the composting process and potentially release some very nasty odors.

Composting toilets have two bins, with one to catch liquids and the other for solids. They are designed to be used while sitting down, which will ensure both types of waste end up in the right containers.

How Bad Do Composting Toilets Smell?

If it is properly installed and maintained, a high-quality modern composting toilet should release no odors. Most have ventilator hoses, carbon filters, and 12-volt fans to ensure any smells end up outside your home, RV, or boat.

However, if you cross-contaminate the solid waste with urine, this can release foul smells, which is why composting toilets keep the two types of waste separate.

Do You Have to Empty a Composting Toilet?

You will need to empty a composting toilet at some point. Unlike flushing toilets, the waste won’t be removed automatically. It breaks down in the bin, sped up by the toilet’s agitator, and will need to be removed, whether you use it on your plants or simply dispose of it.

Depending on the toilet, you might only need to remove its solid waste every few months. However, smaller ones will probably need you to empty their contents every four to six weeks.

What Can You Do With Composting Toilet Waste?

You can add the compost from your composting toilet to a pile in your garden. Once it has broken down enough, it can be sprinkled around your flower beds to serve as fertilizer. It will be as beneficial to plants as animal manure.

Do You Need Plumbing for a Composting Toilet?

All you will need to install a composting toilet is an outside vent. There is no other plumbing involved. This means you can install a composting toilet almost anywhere with minimal effort, which makes it ideal for cabins, boats, RVs, and general off-grid living.

How Much Does It Cost to Install a Composting Toilet?

Installing a composting toilet shouldn’t cost you anything, compared to a conventional plumbed toilet which could cost hundreds or even thousands of dollars. Even if you don’t have much experience, you should be able to fit a composting toilet. They don’t require any plumbing and will only need a basic electrical connection if they have a 12-volt fan to aerate the solids.

Are Composting Toilets Worth the Money?

A composting toilet is a great option if you want to be kinder to the environment without sacrificing the quality of your bathroom. They are also ideal for bringing a little luxury to off-grid living.

They reduce the water costs associated with traditional flushing toilets and instead use “blackwater” (sewage) to create compost. They do this via the natural decomposition process, eliminating chemicals and the huge volume of water used when you flush a conventional toilet.

These toilets require minimal maintenance, so you won’t need to hire a plumber, and there shouldn’t be any major issues with them in the future. A composting toilet will help reduce your overall carbon footprint and is much easier on your wallet in the long run.

They reduce the amount of waste that ends up in landfills and provide your garden with a free source of fertilizer. Composting enriches the soil with beneficial nutrients and reduces the methane released into the atmosphere.

Do You Put Toilet Paper In a Composting Toilet?

You can put toilet paper in a composting toilet. Many composting toilets can break down any biodegradable toilet paper material, such as unbleached paper, cardboard, and cotton.

However, some toilets require special “compostable” toilet paper and need the solid waste and liquid waste to be separated before emptying it into another container.

Read your owner’s manual or check with the manufacturer to find out which types of toilet paper will be safe for use in your specific toilet.

How Long Does It Take a Composting Toilet to Compost?

The waste in a composting toilet usually takes about 12 months to fully break down into compost. The material in the tank is slowly broken down by microbes and other natural decomposers.

As organic matter decomposes, it slowly turns into a nutrient-rich fertilizer that can be used to feed plants or spread on lawns.

How long it takes for the compost to be ready to use will depend on the type of system and the surrounding environment. The local temperature, oxygen level, and moisture can all influence the speed of decomposition.

If your toilet reaches full capacity before the compost is ready, you can add its contents to a compost bin to give it more time to break down.

Do Composting Toilets Work in the Winter?

Composting toilets will still work in the winter, although the composting process will probably slow down or stop entirely if it is very cold. This is because the temperature will prevent the microbes from breaking down organic matter.

To help your composting toilet keep functioning throughout the year, you can insulate it with material such as foam board and wrap any exposed pipes to prevent them from freezing.

Try to keep the composting chamber’s temperature above 0°C so it can decompose materials properly. If you can do this, your composting toilet should continue to function even in cold weather.

How Often Do Composting Toilets Need to be Changed?

You will probably need to empty your composting toilet about every three months, but this will depend on how many people use it and how often.

As composting toilets rely on natural biological processes to break down organic matter, they usually require less maintenance than standard flush toilets.

However, you should still check them regularly to ensure that the compost is being aerated and mixed properly. Empty the tanks whenever they become full or if you notice any unpleasant odors, as bad smells usually indicate a lack of air or a bacterial imbalance.

With proper care and maintenance, your composting toilet can last many years without needing to be changed.

What Is the Best Type of Composting Toilet?

The OGO composting toilet is an excellent all-around option for anyone looking for an advanced waste management system. With a sleek modern design and an electronic agitator, it will ensure that all waste is evenly mixed and quickly broken down into usable compost.

It has an integrated urine separation feature with a visible indicator that enables users to monitor their liquid levels without any guesswork.

By adding this OGO toilet to your home, you will have an energy-efficient way to dispose of your waste while also benefitting your garden.


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About the Author

Mark Weir

Mark spent 24 years working in real estate, so he knows his way around a home. He also worked with contractors and experts, advising them on issues of planning, investments, and renovations. Mark is no stranger to hands-on experience, having renovated his own home and many properties for resale. He likes nothing better than seeing a project through to completion.