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Hanging a Door Wreath (9 DIY Ideas)

Updated
Donโ€™t wreck your door. Use these tips for hanging a wreath.

Have you ever wanted a beautiful wreath on your door but weren’t sure how to hang it without ruining the door? Or how high to place it?

Hanging a door wreath is possible through multiple methods. Weโ€™ll show you just how to hang a wreath on a door, with or without a hanger, and what to consider before doing so. This way, you can hang your stunning wreath without a problem!


Wreath Placement on Front Door

For classic Christmas wreath placement, keep the wreath’s center at eye level and in the center of the door. Eye level is usually considered to be at 57 inches. However, this number is not etched in stone.

The appropriate height varies according to the size of the wreath and the door. A wreath of 24 inches in diameter would be an excellent size for a regular 36-inch door. With these proportions, the wreath should be hung 12 inches above the top of the door.

A 36-inch wreath, on the other hand, should hang 14 inches from the top of a standard-size door.

What to Consider When Hanging a Wreath

Learning how to hang a wreath on a door might sound easy, but there are a few things to consider first.

Weight

To establish the weight of your wreath, use the following trick: weigh an empty box first, then add your wreath and calculate the difference.

The majority of wreaths weigh less than five pounds. This is especially useful if you have taken the effort to handcraft a wreath and are unsure of its weight. Avoid hanging wreaths that are heavier than 15 pounds.

Proper Hanging

Whatever art you choose to hang must be hung properly to avoid it slipping off the wall or becoming damaged. In translation, this means that you have to choose the proper hanging method to put a wreath on a door.

Door Material

Most wreaths are designed to work with finished wood, metal, or glass doors. So be careful to consider the surface material before selecting a hanging mechanism.

How to Hang a Wreath Without Damaging The Door

We commonly use staples, nails, and even thumbtacks to hang Christmas wreaths on the door. But each of these tried-and-true ways causes wear and tear over time. A wreath hanger for a door can come in handy in such situations.

Important

When wreath holders get trapped, your door won’t close, and the doorframe might get damaged, so be careful.

If you have a metal door, stapling the ribbon of your wreath to the top of the door doesn’t work. It creates an unattractive collection of staples on other door materials when the holidays are over.

Hanging a door wreath without nails or screws simply means you have to get creative. There are plenty of DIY solutions that won’t damage the door.

1. Command Hooks

Command hooks are the best way to hang a wreath without damaging the door. Choose a metal command hook that’s appropriate for the weight of your wreath and the surface you’ll be hanging it from. Because they’re so sleek and unobtrusive.

Instead of using the hook on the back of the wreath, you can make a loop using floral wire and attach it to the hook that way.

One idea I love is to hide the hook by placing it on the inside of the door. Attach a ribbon to the wreath. Then loop the ribbon over the door when open and attach it to the command hook.

2. Magnetic Hanger

The backs of these hangers include strong magnets, and the hooks at the bottom of the magnetic circles serve as the attachment points for the garments being hung.

Attaching these to the door will necessitate the assistance of another person. To hang the wreath, place a magnetic hook in the desired location on the window to hang the wreath.

While you’re inside, have a friend hold the second magnet in place over the first on the outside of the window. This will ensure that the hooks stay in place on both sides of the glass. Afterward, attach your wreath on either side of the door, depending on your preference.

3. Ribbons

Measure the distance from the top of the door to just below the top arc of the wreath, then hang your wreath as desired. Cut the ribbon after multiplying the length by two. The ribbon should be tucked beneath the wreath’s arc and brought up just above the door’s threshold.

The ribbon can be attached in a variety of ways. If you’d rather not use a staple gun, you can tie a knot in the ribbon and hang it from a clear command hook. Just put it upside down on the back of your door’s interior.

4. Suction Cups

Suction cups are a great choice if you want to place miniature wreaths on non-porous surfaces such as mirrors. Keep an eye out for the maximum weight supported by the suction cups and make your selections appropriately.

5. Over-the-Door Hanger

Over-the-door hangers are the most typical method of securing a wreath. Especially if you alter your wreaths throughout the year, adjustable variants are the way to go.

Avoid drawing attention away from the wreath. Just make sure you choose a hanger that mixes in with the color of your front door.

6. Door Knocker

If you already have a door knocker, you may hang your wreath on it with a piece of ribbon and no tools.

7. Double-Sided Tape

Certain types of double-sided foam tapes might actually hold a small wreath. This won’t damage the door as much as nails or screws will. But you’re going to have to thoroughly clean the door to get the tape off. I recommend one like EZlifego Double-Sided Tape.

8. Wreath Hanger

This is something you’ve probably never heard of before now. If you hadn’t seen it in action, you might be unsure of what it does. Wreath hangers are made of metal or plastic and are formed like an S.

They are 1-2 feet in length and are intended to hook over the top of the door. Installation is as simple as placing your wreath hanger in the desired location and slipping your wreath through it.

Even though the basic concept of wreath hangers is the same, the designs that go along with them can be rather varied. They’re available in a variety of colors and textures. A few are fashioned into sculptures, while others are braided into spirals.

9. Picture Hooks

Make sure you get a hook that can support the weight of your wreath. Most people just use a nail to attach the wreath. But if you’re afraid, you can use a hook attached to the inside of your door instead.

The wreath can then be hung outdoors by wrapping the thread, ribbon, or fishing line around the rear of the door. As a result, the hook will be hidden from your sight. You can keep the hook in place even if you don’t plan on using the wreath.

FAQs

Sometimes we just need a little extra assurance. Here are some common questions I come across on this topic.

How Do You Hang a Heavy Wreath on a Front Door?

To hang a heavy wreath, you simply have to choose a hook that can support the weight of the wreath. Be sure to read the guidelines on the package. But I would recommend using a heavy-duty wreath hanger.

How Do You Hang a Wreath on a Tall Door?

You can do this by using clear rope, string, or twine. This helps you adjust the position of the wreath to match the level of your choice.

How Do You Hang a Wreath on a Fiberglass Door?

You can choose pretty much any method to hang a wreath on a fiberglass door. Adhesive hooks and magnetic hooks work well, and you could even drill holes through the door.


Bottom Line

Ta-da! You know how to hang a wreath on a door. So, choose the hanging method that’s most suitable for you. Remember to always consider the weight limits for any potential hooks and calculate the position based on the size of the wreath.

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About the Author

Candace Osmond

Candace Osmond is a USA TODAY Bestselling Author and Award-Winning Interior Designer. Using her years of hands-on experience, she now writes about design and DIY. She currently resides on the rocky East Coast of Canada with her family and slobbery bulldog.