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7 Best Circular Saw Blades of 2024

Updated
Whatever the size or style of the circular saw you have, there is a blade to suit every purpose.

Circular saws are powerful handheld tools that can quickly slice through sheet material. However, as effective as they are, even the best circular saw will be ineffective without a sharp, suitable blade.

There will be various circular saw blades to choose from, with different tooth counts that will make them effective for specific cutting tasks. If you haven’t purchased them before, you might need some help to find the best blade for your needs.

To help you choose the right product, we have reviewed seven of the best circular saw blades that are currently available. We chose these blades for their material, teeth per inch, kerf, and any protective coatings they have.

Our Top Picks

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Image
Model
Product Comparison Table
Features

Product Image of the DeWALT Circular Saw Blade Set
Best General-Purpose Circular Saw Blade
DeWALT Circular Saw Blade Set
  • Excellent general-purpose blade
  • Carbide-tipped
  • 60-tooth fine finish
Product Image of the Makita A-03681 Circular Saw Blade
Best for Hardwood
Makita A-03681 Circular Saw Blade
  • 5-degree hook teeth
  • Carbide teeth
  • 80 teeth per inch
Product Image of the Bosch DCB1072CD Edge Blade
Best for Medium-Density Fiberboard (MDF)
Bosch DCB1072CD Edge Blade
  • Micrograin formulation
  • Triple-chip grind teeth
  • Carbide teeth
Product Image of the Irwin Metal Cutting Saw Blade
Best for Metal
Irwin Metal Cutting Saw Blade
  • Anti-vibration vents
  • Anti-kickback shoulder design
  • Carbide-tipped teeth
Product Image of the Freud Thin Kerf Circular Saw Blade
Best for Melamine
Freud Thin Kerf Circular Saw Blade
  • Perma-shield coating
  • Laser-cut anti-vibration slots
  • 60 teeth & thin kerf
Product Image of the Oshlun SBW-080024 8-Inch Saw Blade
Best Value Circular Saw Blade
Oshlun SBW-080024 8-Inch Saw Blade
  • Carbide teeth
  • Anti-kickback design
  • Ideal for framing
Product Image of the Porter-Cable Circular Saw Blade
Best for Plywood
Porter-Cable Circular Saw Blade
  • 120 teeth
  • Slices through plywood
  • Carbon steel

Review Methodology: At Sensible Digs, our hands-on experience and rigorous assessment of circular saw blades ensure we provide an accurate and professional evaluation of each product. We delve into the data, conducting in-depth analysis and comparative research, tracking performance and scoring based on key criteria. Our reviews measure the blade’s durability, cutting speed, material compatibility, and design features, which greatly affect user experience. We identify what sets top-performing blades apart from the rest and provide evidence-backed recommendations. Trust in Sensible Digs to guide you towards the best circular saw blade for your needs, based on our objective findings and reviews.



The Best Circular Saw Blades of 2024

Circular saw blades may all look similar at a glance but this basic shape can be used for various cutting jobs. To help you find the right one for your project, we have reviewed seven of the best circular saw blades you can buy today, chosen for their TPI, thickness, blade material, and durability.

DeWALT 10-Inch General-Purpose Circular Saw Blade Set

Best General-Purpose Circular Saw Blade

It is probably no surprise to find a DeWALT product on any of our lists. The company is known for its high quality and constant innovation, and this set gives you two blades for the price of one. It contains a 60-tooth cross-cutting blade and a 32-tooth general-purpose blade.

Each blade is computer balanced to reduce vibration and improve accuracy, which should result in a smoother finish. The tungsten carbide teeth stay sharper for longer because they resist heat, which frequently dulls lower-quality blades.

These slim-kerf blades will cut through hardwood, softwood, melamine, chipboard, and plywood. If you are looking for a versatile blade set that will be suitable for most of your cutting tasks, this DeWALT pair is a great choice.

Pros

  • Comes in a pack of 2
  • Excellent general-purpose blades
  • Carbide-tipped
  • 60-tooth fine finish blade

Cons

  • Not the best quality carbide-tipped blades

Product Specs

Weight 3 pounds
Size (Inches) 10
Material Tungsten carbide
Used for General-purpose crosscutting
Total teeth 32 and 60
Max RPM 6,000
Price $$

Our Ratings

Material Quality
4.5 / 5
Cutting Efficiency
4.5 / 5
Compatibility
4.5 / 5
Durability
4.5 / 5
Total Rating
4.5 / 5

User Experience

From the moment I installed these blades on my Craftsman table saw, I noticed an impressive difference in my cuts. Whether slicing through plastic or oak wood, these blades consistently delivered clean, smooth results, particularly the 60 tooth blade for finer woodworking tasks. However, while they excelled with lighter tasks, I found they could deflect easily when pushed on thicker material due to their thinness. Despite this minor drawback, these blades haven't let me down and I was pleasantly surprised by their performance, especially considering the longevity of the original 32 tooth blade. While these blades may not be the best option for super fine cuts, they certainly hold their own for heavy-duty use, making them a valuable addition to my toolkit.

Makita A-03681 10-Inch Circular Saw Blade

Best Circular Saw Blade for Hardwood

This Makita blade is honed with 600 grit to give the teeth a mirror finish. The teeth are made of carbide, so they are heat-resistant and stay sharper for longer. The blade has 80 teeth per inch, so it is ideal for sawing through hardwood as well as plywood.

This high TPI means less tear-out and shredding, unlike other blades with fewer teeth. The ultra-thin kerf complements the 5-degree hook teeth. If you want to make fine cuts that don’t require any extra finishing, this blade will be ideal.

The other advantage of a thin kerf is less stress on the saw motor, which will protect your circular saw. You will also waste less material when cutting.

Pros

  • 5-degree hook teeth
  • Carbide teeth
  • 80 teeth per inch
  • Thin kerf

Cons

  • Expensive

Product Specs

Weight 5 pounds
Size (Inches) 10
Material Carbide
Used for Hardwood
Total teeth 80
Max RPM 5,870
Price $$$

Our Ratings

Material Quality
4.5 / 5
Cutting Efficiency
5 / 5
Compatibility
4 / 5
Durability
4.5 / 5
Total Rating
4.5 / 5

Personal Perspective

I'm quite satisfied with these blades, especially when used in my home improvement projects involving my miter and table saws. They've held up well, providing clean, precise cuts while installing laminate flooring throughout my 2600 square foot house, and have proved to be a useful tool in my board and batten work. While there's a minor annoyance of a ringing sound when running in my table saw, it doesn't detract from the overall quality and affordability of the blades. The high tooth count provides cleaner cuts, making it a significant upgrade from my previous Black and Decker blade, and it still remains sharp even after extensive use.

Bosch DCB1072CD Edge Circular Saw Blade

Best Circular Saw Blade for Medium-Density Fiberboard (MDF)

This Bosch saw blade can cut composite decking, so it will make short work of MDF and other soft materials. It has brute carbide teeth with upgraded C3/C4 micro grain formulation, which increases the blade’s durability and keeps it sharper for longer.

The teeth are a triple-chip grind, so they deliver a high-quality finish even when cutting abrasive materials. The thinner kerf provides a faster cut and places less strain on your saw’s motor.

The only downside is that this high quality comes at a price. It costs twice what you would pay for some multi-blade sets.

Pros

  • Micrograin formulation
  • Ideal for composite materials
  • Triple-chip grind teeth
  • Carbide teeth

Cons

  • Expensive

Product Specs

Weight 1.82 pounds
Size (Inches) 10
Material Carbide
Used for Composites, MDF
Total teeth 72
Max RPM 6,000
Price $$$

Our Ratings

Material Quality
4.5 / 5
Cutting Efficiency
4.5 / 5
Compatibility
4.5 / 5
Durability
4.5 / 5
Total Rating
4.5 / 5

Community Feedback

If you're seeking a reliable blade for your miter saw, look no further than this blade. From my firsthand experience, it effortlessly slices through composite materials like Trex, leaving behind impeccably smooth and clean cuts. I found it equally capable when it came to lumber, again as long as I maintained a slow pace. This blade proved its worth in precision jobs too, handling plywood like a dream due to its square tips. And while price doesn't usually reflect performance, in this case, it surpasses more expensive alternatives, delivering smooth and burr-free cuts even after extensive use.

Irwin 7.5-Inch Metal Cutting Saw Blade

Best Circular Saw Blade for Metal

This Irwin blade is the result of cutting-edge design and state-of-the-art technology. It is laser-cut, with anti-vibration vents to prevent the blade from wobbling and ensure you make straighter cuts. The teeth contain a special carbide that can slice through steel and other non-ferrous metals.

This also means the teeth stay sharper for longer, even when you use them to cut through harder materials. Irwin utilizes an anti-kickback design on the shoulders to reduce the risk of accidents. The shape of the blade also creates less waste material and sparks.

This 68-tooth blade is designed with professionals in mind and is the ideal choice for all your metal-cutting needs.

Pros

  • Anti-vibration vents
  • 68 teeth
  • Anti-kickback shoulder design
  • Carbide-tipped teeth

Cons

  • Expensive
  • Best suited for sheet metal

Product Specs

Weight 13.8 ounces
Size (Inches) 7.25
Material Carbide
Used for Metal
Total teeth 68
Max RPM 4,000
Price $$$

Our Ratings

Material Quality
4.5 / 5
Cutting Efficiency
4.5 / 5
Compatibility
4 / 5
Durability
4.5 / 5
Total Rating
4.25 / 5

First-Hand Impression

Love how this blade transformed my DIY home improvements. As an owner of an older house with uneven steel roofing, I needed a solution for cutting through the metal to fix the rain runoff issue. This blade was an excellent solution, effortlessly slicing through both the steel roof and aluminum gutters, leaving a relatively smooth finish. However, be aware, it's loud and it sprays sharp metal fragments everywhere, so wearing protective gear is a must. Unlike other alternatives I tried, this blade cuts quickly and cools down fast, proving to be an efficient tool. After a year of using it on various materials like wood with nails, rebar, and steel unistrut, it's still going strong, making it a worthwhile investment.

Freud 7.25-Inch Thin Kerf Circular Saw Blade

Best Circular Saw Blade for Melamine

This Freud blade employs a Hi-ATB tooth configuration with a thin kerf and 2-degree hook teeth to remove more debris and place less strain on the saw’s motor. It also has laser-cut, anti-vibration slots to reduce sideways movement and increase the blade’s accuracy and longevity.

Freud manufactures its own titanium cobalt carbide called TiCo high-density, which helps these blades crosscut more effectively. This blade has 60 teeth and is suitable for cutting melamine and other composite boards.

It won’t tear or shred the material as the blade slices through. To help it move through the material smoothly, it has a Perma-Shield non-stick coating that lubricates its surface.

Pros

  • Perma-Shield coating
  • Laser-cut anti-vibration slots
  • 60 teeth
  • Thin kerf

Cons

  • Expensive

Product Specs

Weight 12 ounces
Size (Inches) 7.25
Material Tungsten cobalt carbide
Used for Melamine, plywood, laminates
Total teeth 60
Max RPM 10,000
Price $$$

Our Ratings

Material Quality
4.5 / 5
Cutting Efficiency
4.5 / 5
Compatibility
4 / 5
Durability
4.5 / 5
Total Rating
4.25 / 5

User Experience

I procured this blade specifically for cutting a Formica countertop bonded to particle board, and the performance was beyond my initial expectations. I was able to make a precise cut, with the blade slicing smoothly through the countertop, leaving a clean, chip-free edge. This blade even outperformed other brands I've tried before, delivering a top-notch finish at a significantly lower cost. Furthermore, I found this blade to be ideal for other tasks, including creating 16-foot rips through 4-inch thick wood with minimal drag.

Oshlun SBW-080024 8-Inch Saw Blade

Best Value Circular Saw Blade

If you are looking for a high-performance blade but don’t want to pay premium prices, this is a great option. It is more of a general-purpose blade but also works well for framing.

It has 24 teeth, super-thin kerf, cooling vents, and expansion slots to prevent blade movement. It also has a unique anti-kickback design that makes it safer to use. This all adds up to an impressive blade, especially considering that it is much cheaper than some of the most expensive ones that we have looked at.

The teeth have an aggressive hook angle and are made of carbide to prevent overheating, which keeps them sharper for longer. This blade will cut through hardwood, softwood, particleboard, and plywood.

Pros

  • Carbide teeth
  • Anti-kickback design
  • Excellent price
  • Ideal for framing

Cons

  • Quality issues
  • Warps easily

Product Specs

Weight 8 ounces
Size (Inches) 8
Material Carbide-tipped
Used for General-purpose, framing
Total teeth 24
Max RPM 7,500
Price $

Our Ratings

Material Quality
3.5 / 5
Cutting Efficiency
4 / 5
Compatibility
4.5 / 5
Durability
3 / 5
Total Rating
3.75 / 5

Personal Perspective

Love the way this blade performs, especially when working with tough hardwoods. It's a breeze to install and it provides impressively smooth and clean cuts without any wobble. I swapped this blade into my 18 volt Ryobi mitre saw and the difference was striking. When dealing with a framing job, the blade sliced through long rip cuts like butter without any fuss. Though it's still early days, it's held its sharpness well, making the cross cuts in red oak remarkably smooth and satisfying.

Porter-Cable 4.5-Inch Circular Saw Blade

Best Circular Saw Blade for Plywood

This Porter-Cable saw blade is an affordable option, costing much less than high-end Freud and Bosch blades. It has 120 teeth, so it is ideal for cutting plywood and veneers. It causes almost no shredding or tearing out, which means its finish will be extra-neat.

Plywood is notorious for shredding and splintering when cut, but this blade cuts so finely that you won’t need to worry about it. The blade is made of carbon steel, so you shouldn’t expect it to have the same lifespan as cobalt or carbide-tipped blades.

As the blade is carbon steel, overheating will also be an issue. Even so, for the price, this is a very effective saw blade.

Pros

  • Excellent value for money
  • 120 teeth
  • Cuts plywood without splintering
  • Carbon steel

Cons

  • Cheaply made
  • Dulls quickly

Product Specs

Weight 2.72 ounces
Size (Inches) 4.5
Material Steel
Used for Plywood, laminate
Total teeth 120
Max RPM 7,500
Price $

Our Ratings

Material Quality
3 / 5
Cutting Efficiency
4 / 5
Compatibility
4.5 / 5
Durability
2.5 / 5
Total Rating
3.5 / 5

Community Feedback

After using this Porter-Cable saw blade, I was impressed by its ability to finely cut plywood and veneers without the usual shredding or splintering. This blade, boasting 120 teeth, is an affordable alternative to high-end brands, offering excellent value for money. The finish it gives is extra-neat, eliminating any worry about messy cuts. However, being made of carbon steel, this saw blade tends to overheat and doesn't have the same lifespan as cobalt or carbide-tipped blades. So, while it does dull quicker than I'd like, it's still a pretty effective tool considering the price point.

Product Comparison Chart

Product Best Weight Size (Inch) Material Used for Total teeth Max RPM
DeWALT Circular Saw Blade Set General-Purpose 3 lbs 10 Tungsten carbide General-purpose crosscutting 32 & 60 6,000
Makita A-03681 Circular Saw Blade Hardwood 5 lbs 10 Carbide Hardwood 80 5,870
Bosch DCB1072CD Edge Blade Medium-Density Fiberboard 1.82 lbs 10 Carbide Composites, MDF 72 6,000
Irwin Metal Cutting Saw Blade Metal 13.8 oz 7 Carbide Metal 68 4,000
Freud Thin Kerf Circular Saw Blade Melamine 12 oz 7.25 Tungsten cobalt carbide Melamine, plywood, laminates 60 10,000
Oshlun SBW-080024 8-Inch Saw Blade Value For Money 8 oz 8 Carbide-tipped general-purpose, framing 24 7,500
Porter-Cable Circular Saw Blade Plywood 2.72 oz 5 Steel Plywood, laminate 120 7,500

Circular Saw Blade Types

There are various types of circular saw blades to choose from, each designed for specific purposes. The blade type will influence the number of teeth per inch and how they are arranged, which will have a significant impact on whether or not a blade is suitable for a particular task.

Flat Top Grind (FTG)

FTG blades have teeth that sit square to the saw plate. They cut through wood, much like a chisel. They rip the wood perpendicular to the grain, which means they won’t produce smooth cuts.

Pros

  • Great for rip cuts
  • Hard wearing
  • Cuts quickly

Cons

  • Only suitable for rip cuts

Alternate Top Bevel (ATB)

The teeth of an ATB blade point in alternating directions and they are designed primarily to shear wood. These are all-purpose blades that will be suitable for general cutting jobs.

Pros

  • General-purpose cutting
  • Very versatile
  • Great for joinery

Cons

  • Don’t excel in any area
  • Not suitable for refined woodworking

High-Angle Alternative Bevel (HI-ATB)

These blades are a variation of the ATB design, with a different bevel angle. HI-ATB blades have a bevel angle of between 25 and 38 degrees, compared to 10 to 20 degrees for ATB blades.

High-angle blades are excellent for cutting veneers and other sheet-engineered wood used in cabinet making and bespoke furniture.

Pros

  • Great for engineered wood
  • Cuts smooth lines
  • No chipping
  • Suitable for laminate

Cons

  • Fragile
  • Prone to wear and tear

Triple-Chip Grind (TCG)

TCG blades have alternating chamfered and raker teeth. The chamfered teeth rough cut, while the raker teeth clean up the cut. This is the right blade to use for sawing plastic laminate and Corian, as well as non-ferrous metals such as brass and aluminum.

Pros

  • Cuts a wide range of materials
  • Makes neat cuts

Cons

  • Better for materials other than wood
  • Not for general cutting

How To Choose a Circular Saw Blade

There are several important factors to consider that will help you choose the right circular saw blade. Some of these elements might be more important than others, depending on the specific task you need the blade for.

Size of Blade

Circular saw blade sizes are usually 8, 10, or 12 inches. 10 and 12 are far more common but 8-inch mini circular saws are growing in popularity, as are even smaller blades. Some measure just 4.5 inches.

Top Tip

If you need to know what size blade your circular saw will accommodate, check your owner’s manual. Choosing the correct size is important because you won’t be able to fit a large blade in a small saw.

Type of Saw

The type of saw you own will determine which kind of blade you need. Make sure the arbor fits the shaft of the saw. If you have a mismatched blade and saw, the blade might tip during use, which could ruin whatever you are working on.

Teeth

How many teeth a circular saw blade has will determine how it can be used. As a general rule, the higher the number of teeth per inch, the smoother the cut will be. This means saws with a high TPI are better suited to cutting tough materials such as sheet metal and hardwood.

If the tooth count is lower, the blade will be better for softer materials where cuts can be less precise.

How Many Teeth Do You Need on a Circular Saw Blade?

The number of teeth you need will be determined by the material you are cutting. If you are cutting softwood or similar materials, fewer teeth will be better. Harder materials will require greater tooth density.

This chart should help you :

Type of Blade TPI Total Number of Teeth (Average) Suitable For
Coarse 3 to 8 40 to 60 Lumber, hardwood, softwood, MDF
Medium 8 to 18 60 to 80 Lumber, hardwood, softwood, MDF, plyboard, sheet metals
Fine 18 to 32 80 to 120 Plyboard, frames, sheet material, non-ferrous metal

Quick Note

Blades with 14 to 18 teeth per inch are best suited for general-purpose cutting.

Kerf

Kerf refers to the width of the blade, which is reflected in the thickness of the cut it makes and how much material it wastes. A full kerf has an edge measuring 0.125 inches, whereas a thin kerf is 0.094 inches.

Full kerfs are more durable and better suited to cutting tougher materials. However, a blade with full kerf places more stress on the saw motor. If the motor is underpowered, this can lead to it overheating and potentially burning out.

A thin kerf suits finer detail work and wastes less material. They also require less power to use, so the motor won’t need to work as hard, which will protect your saw. The downside of these blades is that they wear out more quickly due to having thinner edges.

Blade Coating

Many popular brands including Freud and Bosch coat their blades in special non-stick solutions. These coatings reduce friction and help the blade slice through the material more easily. By preventing binding, they also reduce the risk of kickbacks, which can be major hazards when using circular saws.

Blade Material

Carbon Steel

Carbon steel blades are well suited to cutting soft materials and plastics. They are the cheapest blades you can buy but they will dull quickly due to their soft teeth. This means they won’t last long if you use them frequently. There is an upside to their softness, however, as they are flexible, which means they are less likely to snap during use.

High-Speed Steel (HSS)

Compared to carbon steel blades, high-speed steel is far more durable. These blades retain their cutting edge for longer and have better heat resistance, which means they won’t need to be replaced as frequently.

Typically, these blades can withstand temperatures of up to 600 degrees centigrade and score between 62 and 66 on the Rockwell Hardness Scale. As they are designed for use at higher speeds, HSS blades will cut through MDF and hardwood with ease.

Cobalt Steel Blades

Cobalt steel is an alloy containing between 5% and 8% cobalt. Blades made of it are robust and can withstand even more punishment than HSS blades. Cobalt steel blades can also cope with very high temperatures, which makes them resistant to dulling during even heavy-duty work.

These blades outlast high-speed steel blades and far outperform carbon steel blades. Their only downside is that they are brittle and prone to snapping if they aren’t used carefully.

Carbide-Tipped Blades

Carbide-tipped blades are more expensive than other types because they are extremely durable. They typically score 65 to 80 on the Rockwell Hardness Scale, which means they are among the hardest-wearing blades you can buy.

They will cut through sheet metal, aluminum, and even steel. However, like cobalt steel, carbide-tipped blades can be brittle so you will need to use them carefully.

Job Suitability

Carbon steel blades are best used for cutting soft materials such as softwood and lumber. It is possible to buy carbon steel blades that can cut sheet metal and other non-ferrous metals, but the teeth usually dull very quickly.

Carbon steel blades are characterized by having lower tooth counts, a sign that they are best suited to less intense jobs.

Best For: Rip cuts, crosscuts, lumber, softwood, plastic, soft sheet metal.

High-speed steel and cobalt steel are both very durable. They will cut through wood, steel, aluminum, plastics, and composites such as MDF. These blades have improved heat resistance and retain their sharpness for longer, so they are both popular choices.

Cobalt steel and high-speed blades usually have higher TPIs that help them cut through harder materials. This also results in a smoother finish.

Best For: Crosscuts, hardwood, MDF, metal, plastic, smoother finishes.

Carbide-tipped blades are the most durable type you can buy and are used to cut the hardest materials, even concrete blocks. These teeth rarely require maintenance but, when they do, you will always be able to restore them to their original sharpness.

Best For: Crosscuts, hardwood, plastic, metal, concrete blocks, smooth finishes.

Who Makes the Best Circular Saw Blades?

Bosch

Robert Bosch founded the “Workshop for Precision Mechanics and Electrical Engineering” in Stuttgart in Germany in 1886. By 1901, Bosch had transitioned into automotive supplies and built a reputation for constant innovation (1).

Today, Bosch is one of the leading manufacturers of tools and accessories around the world, with hundreds of thousands of employees.

DeWALT

Raymond DeWalt, a sawmill supervisor, invented the radial arm saw in 1922 with the goal of improving productivity. In the century since, his company has grown to become one of the biggest global tool manufacturers (2). DeWALT is held in high regard as an innovator of high-quality tools and accessories.

Makita

Makita was founded in 1915 as a motor sales, repair, and servicing company. By 1958, Makita had introduced the first electric planer and shifted its focus to manufacturing power tools (3). Today, Makita is a global brand and is known for its high quality and reliability.

Irwin Tools

Irwin Tools was founded in Martinsville, Ohio in 1885 by Charles Irwin. The company patented the first Auger drill bit and became one of the leading names in bits and blades. In 1993, Irwin Tools was acquired by the American Tool Company (4) and remains an industry leader in tool accessories.


How To Change a Circular Saw Blade

1. Disconnect the Power

Before proceeding, make sure you disconnect the power supply from the wall socket or remove the saw’s battery.

2. Engage the Locking Mechanism

Press down on the arbor lock button, then rotate the blade until it engages the locking mechanism.

3. Use the Blade Wrench

Use the blade wrench to remove the arbor nut. To loosen the nut, turn the wrench in the same direction that the blade usually spins.

4. Retract the Blade Guard

Retract the blade guard and carefully remove the old blade. Even if the teeth aren’t cutting effectively, there will still be sharp edges that could injure you.

5. Insert the New Blade

Put the new blade onto the saw’s arbor, making sure the teeth are facing the correct way to cut effectively. There should be an arrow on the saw’s blade guard that will confirm whether or not you have inserted the blade properly.

6. Tighten the Arbor Nut

Tighten the arbor nut but be careful not to overtighten it. If you do, it will be far more difficult to loosen the next time you need to remove the blade.

You are now ready to plug your saw in and start using it.

How To Clean a Circular Saw Blade

Follow our guide to remove the blade. Once you have, place it in a bowl of warm soapy water. You can use detergent or an all-purpose cleaner if you prefer. Submerge the blade and leave it to soak for 5 to 10 minutes.

Grab a soft brush (an old toothbrush will work) and gently scrub any stubborn dirt or marks to remove them. Hold the blade by its center hole and gently shake it in the water to dislodge any remaining dirt.

Once the blade is clean, lift it out of the water and dry it with a soft, clean cloth. Make sure the blade is completely dry before you place it back into the saw or the moisture might cause corrosion and ultimately ruin your blade.

Again, follow our blade replacement guide to insert the blade back into the saw.

FAQs

How Long Should a Circular Saw Blade Last?

The longevity of a circular saw blade depends largely on the quality and frequency of usage. Generally speaking, high-quality blades can last between 12 and 120 hours of continuous use depending on how often it is used and the material it cuts.

For example, blades specifically designed for cutting hardwoods will need to be replaced more often than those designed for softer woods like pine.

With regular maintenance and proper storage, however, you can ensure that your circular saw blade lasts as long as possible.

Which Type of Circular Saw Blade Stays Sharp the Longest?

The type of circular saw blade that stays sharp the longest is usually the high-speed steel blade. This type of blade maintains its edge better than other blades due to its construction, which includes a thicker and harder steel alloy.

These blades are less vulnerable to heat, wear, and corrosion damage and therefore can stay sharper for longer periods. Using these types of blades may require more frequent sharpening sessions, but it will result in better cutting performance over the long run.

Is It Worth Sharpening Circular Saw Blades?

Sharpening a circular saw blade will not only help to improve its cutting performance but also extend its lifespan too. It can be done using either an abrasive wheel or a special file and it is relatively easy to learn with some practice.

Whilst sharpening blades may not always be necessary, it can save money in the long run and make cutting that much easier. It’s definitely worth a try if you want a way to keep your blades in top condition!

How Many Times Can You Sharpen a Circular Saw Blade?

A circular saw blade can be sharpened about three times before needing to be replaced but the quality of the blade determines the exact number.

With each sharpening session, however, it is important to note the amount of metal removed from the blades as this should not exceed 2 millimeters or there will be a risk of blade breakage.

A little maintenance here and there goes a long way in keeping your circular saw running smoothly!


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About the Author

Mark Weir

Mark spent 24 years working in real estate, so he knows his way around a home. He also worked with contractors and experts, advising them on issues of planning, investments, and renovations. Mark is no stranger to hands-on experience, having renovated his own home and many properties for resale. He likes nothing better than seeing a project through to completion.